Extreme Premature Small for Gestational Age Infants Have Appropriate Catch-up Growth at Term Equivalence Compared with Extreme Premature Appropriate for Gestational Age Infants.

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  • Author(s): Ng, Sze May; Pintus, Donatella; Turner, Mark A.
  • Source:
    Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology (J CLIN RES PEDIATR E), Mar2019; 11(1): 104-108. (5p)
  • Publication Type:
    Article - pictorial, research, tables/charts
  • Language:
    English
  • Additional Information
    • Affiliation:
      University of Liverpool, Institute of Translational Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Liverpool, UK
      Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Paediatrics, Southport, UK
    • Subject Terms:
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      Recent studies have shown that small for gestational age (SGA) term infants undergo catch-up growth during infancy but there is limited studies on early growth outcomes of extreme premature SGA infants. The aim of this study was to compare factors associated during birth in extremely premature infants less than 28 weeks' gestation who were born SGA (<10th percentile for gestational age) with those who were born appropriate-for-gestational age (AGA) (10th-89th percentile) and to determine whether there was catch-up growth at term equivalence. One hundred fifty-three extreme premature infants (89 males) born below 28 weeks' gestation were prospectively recruited. All infants had auxological measurements undertaken and prospective data on pregnancy, maternal factors, perinatal and postnatal data obtained. SGA infants at birth had significantly higher Clinical Risk Index for Babies scores and mortality, lower birth weight, smaller head circumference, smaller mid arm circumference and shorter leg length at time of birth compared with AGA infants. However, at term equivalence, weight and leg length of were not significant between AGA and SGA infants born at extreme prematurity. Our study shows that extreme premature SGA infants have appropriate catch-up growth by the time they reach term equivalence suggesting that postnatal nutrition and care are important determinants of catch-up growth in SGA infants.
    • Journal Subset:
      Biomedical
    • Instrumentation:
      Clinical Risk Index for Babies (CRIB)
    • ISSN:
      1308-5727
    • Publication Date:
      20190225
    • Publication Date:
      20190723
    • Accession Number:
      http://dx.doi.org/10.4274/jcrpe.galenos.2018.2018.0162
    • Accession Number:
      134847912
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      NG, S. M.; PINTUS, D.; TURNER, M. A. Extreme Premature Small for Gestational Age Infants Have Appropriate Catch-up Growth at Term Equivalence Compared with Extreme Premature Appropriate for Gestational Age Infants. Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology, [s. l.], v. 11, n. 1, p. 104–108, 2019. DOI 10.4274/jcrpe.galenos.2018.2018.0162. Disponível em: http://widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=ccm&AN=134847912&authtype=sso&custid=s5834912. Acesso em: 3 jun. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Ng SM, Pintus D, Turner MA. Extreme Premature Small for Gestational Age Infants Have Appropriate Catch-up Growth at Term Equivalence Compared with Extreme Premature Appropriate for Gestational Age Infants. Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology. 2019;11(1):104-108. doi:10.4274/jcrpe.galenos.2018.2018.0162.
    • APA:
      Ng, S. M., Pintus, D., & Turner, M. A. (2019). Extreme Premature Small for Gestational Age Infants Have Appropriate Catch-up Growth at Term Equivalence Compared with Extreme Premature Appropriate for Gestational Age Infants. Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology, 11(1), 104–108. https://doi.org/10.4274/jcrpe.galenos.2018.2018.0162
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Ng, Sze May, Donatella Pintus, and Mark A. Turner. 2019. “Extreme Premature Small for Gestational Age Infants Have Appropriate Catch-up Growth at Term Equivalence Compared with Extreme Premature Appropriate for Gestational Age Infants.” Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology 11 (1): 104–8. doi:10.4274/jcrpe.galenos.2018.2018.0162.
    • Harvard:
      Ng, S. M., Pintus, D. and Turner, M. A. (2019) ‘Extreme Premature Small for Gestational Age Infants Have Appropriate Catch-up Growth at Term Equivalence Compared with Extreme Premature Appropriate for Gestational Age Infants’, Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology, 11(1), pp. 104–108. doi: 10.4274/jcrpe.galenos.2018.2018.0162.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Ng, SM, Pintus, D & Turner, MA 2019, ‘Extreme Premature Small for Gestational Age Infants Have Appropriate Catch-up Growth at Term Equivalence Compared with Extreme Premature Appropriate for Gestational Age Infants’, Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 104–108, viewed 3 June 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Ng, Sze May, et al. “Extreme Premature Small for Gestational Age Infants Have Appropriate Catch-up Growth at Term Equivalence Compared with Extreme Premature Appropriate for Gestational Age Infants.” Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology, vol. 11, no. 1, Mar. 2019, pp. 104–108. EBSCOhost, doi:10.4274/jcrpe.galenos.2018.2018.0162.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Ng, Sze May, Donatella Pintus, and Mark A. Turner. “Extreme Premature Small for Gestational Age Infants Have Appropriate Catch-up Growth at Term Equivalence Compared with Extreme Premature Appropriate for Gestational Age Infants.” Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology 11, no. 1 (March 2019): 104–8. doi:10.4274/jcrpe.galenos.2018.2018.0162.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Ng SM, Pintus D, Turner MA. Extreme Premature Small for Gestational Age Infants Have Appropriate Catch-up Growth at Term Equivalence Compared with Extreme Premature Appropriate for Gestational Age Infants. Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology [Internet]. 2019 Mar [cited 2020 Jun 3];11(1):104–8. Available from: http://widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=ccm&AN=134847912&authtype=sso&custid=s5834912