THE DEMOGRAPHIC RATES AND SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS OF THE NINETEENTH-CENTURY NEGRO POPULATION: A STABLE POPULATION ANALYSIS.

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    • Abstract:
      The article presents stable population analysis of the nineteenth century Negro population. Frequently the social institutions of a society are studied in order to detect the reasons that a particular set of demographic rates characterizes that society. Asiatic and Caribbean values and familial systems have been examined to determine why the women in these areas bear many more offspring than do European women. Sometimes the procedure may be reversed; that is, the ascertained demographic parameters of a group may contribute to analyzing the structure and change of that group's social institutions. A case in point is the Negro population of the nineteenth century in the U.S. Descriptions of the conditions of slaves are strongly colored by pro- or anti-slave bias, with little information relating to the family system, fertility rates, and health conditions of Negroes either before or after emancipation. The social structure of the Negro society produced some particular sets of demographic rates, but no research has been done to discover what patterns of population change characterized the Negro population of the last century.