Immigration and the health of U.S. black adults: Does country of origin matter?

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  • Author(s): Hamilton, Tod G. a, ∗; Hummer, Robert A. b
  • Source:
    In Social Science & Medicine 2011 73(10):1551-1560
  • Publication Information:
    Elsevier Ltd
  • Document Type:
    Article
  • Additional Information
    • Affiliation:
      a Harvard University, Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Society, Human Development, and Health, Landmark Center, 4th floor, 401 Park Dr., Boston, MA 02215, USA
      b University of Texas at Austin, Population Research Center and Department of Sociology, USA
    • Keywords:
      USA
      Immigrants
      Racism
      Health Disparities
      Blacks
      Race
      Discrimination
      Nativity
      Selection
      Healthy migrant effect
    • Abstract:
      Previous work suggests that regional variation in pre-migration exposure to racism and discrimination, measured by a region's racial composition, predicts differences in individual-level health among black immigrants to the United States. We exploit data on both region and country of birth for black immigrants in the United States and methodology that allows for the identification of arrival cohorts to test whether there are sending country differences in the health of black adults in the United States that support this proposition. While testing this hypothesis, we also document heterogeneity in health across arrival cohorts and by duration of U.S. residence among black immigrants. Using data on working-age immigrant and U.S.-born blacks taken from the 1996–2010 waves of the March Current Population Survey, we show that relative to U.S.-born black adults, black immigrants report significantly lower odds of fair/poor health. After controlling for relevant social and demographic characteristics, immigrants’ cohort of arrival, and immigrants’ duration in the United States, our models show only modest differences in health between African immigrants and black immigrants who migrate from the other major sending countries or regions. Results also show that African immigrants maintain their health advantage over U.S.-born black adults after more than 20 years in the United States. In contrast, black immigrants from the Caribbean who have been in the United States for more than 20 years appear to experience some downward health assimilation. In conclusion, after accounting for relevant factors, we find that there are only modest differences in black immigrant health across countries of origin. Black immigrants appear to be very highly selected in terms of good health, although there are some indications of negative health assimilation for black immigrants from the Caribbean.
    • ISSN:
      0277-9536
    • Accession Number:
      10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.07.026
    • Accession Number:
      S0277953611004989
    • Copyright:
      Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      HAMILTON, T. G.; HUMMER, R. A. Immigration and the health of U.S. black adults: Does country of origin matter? Social Science & Medicine, [s. l.], v. 73, n. 10, p. 1551–1560, 2011. DOI 10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.07.026. Disponível em: http://widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edselp&AN=S0277953611004989&authtype=sso&custid=s5834912. Acesso em: 19 set. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Hamilton TG, Hummer RA. Immigration and the health of U.S. black adults: Does country of origin matter? Social Science & Medicine. 2011;73(10):1551-1560. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.07.026
    • APA:
      Hamilton, T. G., & Hummer, R. A. (2011). Immigration and the health of U.S. black adults: Does country of origin matter? Social Science & Medicine, 73(10), 1551–1560. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.07.026
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Hamilton, Tod G., and Robert A. Hummer. 2011. “Immigration and the Health of U.S. Black Adults: Does Country of Origin Matter?” Social Science & Medicine 73 (10): 1551–60. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.07.026.
    • Harvard:
      Hamilton, T. G. and Hummer, R. A. (2011) ‘Immigration and the health of U.S. black adults: Does country of origin matter?’, Social Science & Medicine, 73(10), pp. 1551–1560. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.07.026.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Hamilton, TG & Hummer, RA 2011, ‘Immigration and the health of U.S. black adults: Does country of origin matter?’, Social Science & Medicine, vol. 73, no. 10, pp. 1551–1560, viewed 19 September 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Hamilton, Tod G., and Robert A. Hummer. “Immigration and the Health of U.S. Black Adults: Does Country of Origin Matter?” Social Science & Medicine, vol. 73, no. 10, Jan. 2011, pp. 1551–1560. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.07.026.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Hamilton, Tod G., and Robert A. Hummer. “Immigration and the Health of U.S. Black Adults: Does Country of Origin Matter?” Social Science & Medicine 73, no. 10 (January 1, 2011): 1551–60. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.07.026.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Hamilton TG, Hummer RA. Immigration and the health of U.S. black adults: Does country of origin matter? Social Science & Medicine [Internet]. 2011 Jan 1 [cited 2020 Sep 19];73(10):1551–60. Available from: http://widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edselp&AN=S0277953611004989&authtype=sso&custid=s5834912