Gender and the Victorian novel.

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  • Source:
    Cambridge Companion to the Victorian Novel (9780521641500); 2001, p97-124, 28p Link to Parent Book; Link to Parent Book; Link to Parent Book
  • Document Type:
    Literary Criticism
  • Additional Information
    • Subject Terms:
    • Author Supplied Keywords:
      2-3; Autobiography
      5Christmas Carol
      and Selection in Relation to Sex
      anthropology
      Austen, Jane, Emma
      Breuer, Josef, and female hysteria
      Bronte, Charlotte, Jane Eyre
      Bronte, Emily, Wuthering Heights
      Carlyle, Thomas, Chartism
      Expectations
      Fin-de-siecle, fantastic fiction
      Freud, Sigmund
      Gunn, Simon
      Hall, Catherine
      Hardy, Thomas, Freudian psychoanalysis
      Lennox, Charlotte, The Female Quixote
      Locke, John, Essay on Paternal Authority
      Lukacs, Georg
      Malthus, Thomas, Essay on the Principle of Population
      Marx, Karl
      Mayhew, Henry, and working-class women
      Nordau, Max
      philosophical positivism
      Picture of Dorian Gray
      Schreiner, Olive
      sensation novels
      Shelley, Mary, Frankenstein
      Stoker, Bram, Dracula
      Victorian fiction, aesthetic of realism
      Wells, H. G., i; The Island of Dr. Moreau, Wilson, Edmund, zs4n
    • Abstract:
      The impact and tenacity of the argument launched in Thomas Malthus's famous Essay on the Principle of Population (1798) can mean only one thing: the nineteenth century opened onto a very different field of narrative possibilities than had preoccupied and entertained the previous century, possibilities in terms of which Victorian authors and readers would imagine their lives, write their novels, and hammer out domestic and colonial policy. Although infant mortality rates had changed little for most of the people and would not improve significantly throughout the nineteenth century, the English population was growing younger. Compounded by the fact that no bouts of plague, famine, or other natural disasters had limited the growth of the population, people were marrying at a younger age. Marry a man with whom you were emotionally compatible if you could, but marry a man of material means you must, such novels as Pride and Prejudice (1813) and Emma (1816) seemed to say, or else face the degradation of impoverishment or, worse, the need to work for a living. Given that the population under twenty-five years of age shot up from 46 to 58 percent of the population between the mid-eighteenth century and the beginning of Victoria's reign in 1837, courtship rituals to ensure that deserving women would meet and win the hearts of eligible men could not have been considered a frivolous activity. Nor could knowledge of the social rituals of the sort that fill Austen's pages be distinguished from the political power of a group of men and women who were neither aristocratic nor forced to work for a living. The delicate nuances of feeling and elaborate rituals that gave those feelings both vigor and charm not only consolidated this group but also contained the secret of its perpetuation. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
    • Abstract:
      Copyright of Cambridge Companion to the Victorian Novel (9780521641500) is the property of Cambridge University Press / Books and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
    • ISBN:
      9780521641500
    • Accession Number:
      10.1017/CCOL0521641500.006
    • Accession Number:
      77081601
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      Gender and the Victorian novel. Cambridge Companion to the Victorian Novel (9780521641500), [s. l.], p. 97–124, 2001. DOI 10.1017/CCOL0521641500.006. Disponível em: http://widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=egi&AN=77081601&authtype=sso&custid=s5834912. Acesso em: 20 jan. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Gender and the Victorian novel. Cambridge Companion to the Victorian Novel (9780521641500). January 2001:97-124. doi:10.1017/CCOL0521641500.006.
    • APA:
      Gender and the Victorian novel. (2001). Cambridge Companion to the Victorian Novel (9780521641500), 97–124. https://doi.org/10.1017/CCOL0521641500.006
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      “Gender and the Victorian Novel.” 2001. Cambridge Companion to the Victorian Novel (9780521641500), January, 97–124. doi:10.1017/CCOL0521641500.006.
    • Harvard:
      ‘Gender and the Victorian novel’ (2001) Cambridge Companion to the Victorian Novel (9780521641500), pp. 97–124. doi: 10.1017/CCOL0521641500.006.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      ‘Gender and the Victorian novel’ 2001, Cambridge Companion to the Victorian Novel (9780521641500), pp. 97–124, viewed 20 January 2020, .
    • MLA:
      “Gender and the Victorian Novel.” Cambridge Companion to the Victorian Novel (9780521641500), Jan. 2001, pp. 97–124. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1017/CCOL0521641500.006.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      “Gender and the Victorian Novel.” Cambridge Companion to the Victorian Novel (9780521641500), January 2001, 97–124. doi:10.1017/CCOL0521641500.006.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Gender and the Victorian novel. Cambridge Companion to the Victorian Novel (9780521641500) [Internet]. 2001 Jan [cited 2020 Jan 20];97–124. Available from: http://widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=egi&AN=77081601&authtype=sso&custid=s5834912