Computer Access

The Parker Library is equipped with two computer labs and fifty workstations with three state of the art printers. In addition to the labs the library is furnished with computers in all study rooms. Library users purchase a "Go Print" card that allows easy access to printing and copying.  Computer labs are frequently used by instructors for teaching or testing.  Computers are maintained by the Information Help Desk which is housed adjacent to the library.  The Library frequently uses work study students to assist students in the labs and throughout the library.  

EZ Proxy Authentication

EZproxy is a web proxy server used by the Parker Library to give access to library's resources to users at home or elsewhere. To access the library's databases and electronic journals from off campus, log in using your MyParker login and password.

Go Print

Library users purchase a "Go Print" card that allows easy access to printing and copying.  

How to Use Go Print:

  1. When a document is sent to the printer, a dialogue box will appear.
  2. The GoPrint window requires a Login ID and password. The Login ID is the MyParker login PLUS “@parker.edu”, so a user named “JSmith” would use “JSmith@parker.edu”. The password is their MyParker password. If this does not work, contact the Lab Supervisor or the campus IT department to verify your login ID for GoPrint.
  3. Click "Sign In"
  4. On the following window, a list of print jobs will appear, if items have already been sent to the printer. If the list is empty, that means that items will have to be re-printed on that machine.
  5. To print a print job, check the empty checkbox to the left of the print job, then click “Pay and Print” on the bottom of the window.
  6. To cancel a print job, check the empty checkbox to the left of the print job, then click "Cancel Jobs" at the bottom of the GoPrint window.
  • We recommend logging out of GoPrint when you are finished printing, and also log off of the computer when you are through using it.
  • If your balance is  0.00 in the GoPrint window, go to the Business Office during normal business hours in order to add more ParkerDollars to the printing balance.
  • If a print job printed out incorrectly or printed out incomplete, bring the print job (including cover page, if possible) to the Bookstore during normal business hours for a credit back on your balance.
Copyright

COPYRIGHT AND PERMISSIONS AT PARKER UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

The Parker Library is constantly working to ensure that intellectual property is respected and that our institution remains copyright compliant. To that end, the Library observes and follows copyright law as well as permissions granted by our vendors’ licensing agreements to the best of our ability. Laws and licensing agreements dictate that the Library is ONLY allowed to provide copies and ILL services to current Parker students, faculty and staff (see below for more information re: alumnae privileges at the Parker Library). Failure to abide by licensing agreements and copyright law could result in hefty fines for the University or for the individual who fails to observe these laws/agreements.

Common needs of current and former students and faculty that may present copyright challenges are presented below – if you encounter any of the following needs (or any other needs involving the copying or distribution of copyrighted materials or the intellectual property of others, please contact the library for guidance.

Students: Need copies of book chapters, articles, or documents for group project participants, classmates, journal clubs, etc?

Students should refrain from making and distributing copies of the work of others without obtaining the proper permissions. Though there are exceptions in copyright law for fair and scholarly use in educational, non-profit settings (Fair Use doctrine) to support research and classroom use,  there are limits to the amount of copying and sharing that can be done without violating copyright law and/or permissions granted by vendors and publishers.

Faculty: Need copies of book chapters, articles, or documents for classroom instruction, sharing with Parker colleagues or students, journal clubs, or sharing with colleagues from other institutions?

Faculty and staff should refrain from making and distributing copies of the work of others without obtaining the proper permissions. Though there are exceptions in copyright law for fair and scholarly use in educational, non-profit settings (Fair Use doctrine) to support research and classroom use,  there are limits to the amount of copying and sharing that can be done without violating copyright law and/or permissions granted by vendors and publishers.

Alumnae: Need copy/ies of research articles from the Parker Library?
Alumnae are welcome to come to the Library in person and view hard copy journals and books. However, the Library is unable to provide copy of articles from our databases/e-resources, and is unable to provide Document Delivery or Interlibrary Loan services. Literature searches may be requested by alumnae, and will be provided on a case-by-case basis depending on Library staff availability.

Classroom Copying
AGREEMENT ON GUIDELINES FOR CLASSROOM COPYING IN NOT-FOR-PROFIT EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS WITH RESPECT TO BOOKS AND PERIODICALS

The purpose of the following guidelines is to state the minimum and not the maximum standards of educational fair use under Section 107 of H.R. 2223. The parties agree that the conditions determining the extent of permissible copying for educational purposes may change in the future; that certain types of copying permitted under these guidelines may not be permissible in the future; and conversely that in the future other types of copying not permitted under these guidelines may be permissible under revised guidelines.

Moreover, the following statement of guidelines is not intended to limit the types of copying permitted under the standards of fair use under judicial decision and which are stated in Section 107 of the Copyright Revision Bill. There may be instances in which copying which does not fall within the guidelines stated below may nonetheless be permitted under the criteria of fair use.

GUIDELINES

I. Single Copying for Teachers

A single copy may be made of any of the following by or for a teacher at his or her individual request for his or her scholarly research or use in teaching or preparation to teach a class:

  • A chapter from a book;
  • An article from a periodical or newspaper;
  • A short story, short essay or short poem, whether or not from a collective work;
  • A chart, graph, diagram, drawing, cartoon or picture from a book, periodical, or newspaper;

II. Multiple Copies for Classroom Use

Multiple copies (not to exceed in any event more than one copy per pupil in a course) may be made by or for the teacher giving the course for classroom use or discussion; provided that:

  • The copying meets the tests of brevity and spontaneity as defined below; and,
  • Meets the cumulative effect test as defined below; and,
  • Each copy includes a notice of copyright

Definitions

Brevity

  • (i) Poetry: (a) A complete poem if less than 250 words and if printed on not more than two pages or, (b) from a longer poem, an excerpt of not more than 250 words.
  • (ii) Prose: (a) Either a complete article, story or essay of less than 2,500 words, or (b) an excerpt from any prose work of not more than 1,000 words or 10% of the work, whichever is less, but in any event a minimum of 500 words.

[Each of the numerical limits stated in "i" and "ii" above may be expanded to permit the completion of an unfinished line of a poem or of an unfinished prose paragraph.]

  • (iii) Illustration: One chart, graph, diagram, drawing, cartoon or picture per book or per periodical issue.
  • (iv) "Special" works: Certain works in poetry, prose or in "poetic prose" which often combine language with illustrations and which are intended sometimes for children and at other times for a more general audience fall short of 2,500 words in their entirety. Paragraph "ii" above notwithstanding such "special works" may not be reproduced in their entirety; however, an excerpt comprising not more than two of the published pages of such special work and containing not more than 10% of the words found in the text thereof, may be reproduced.

Spontaneity

  • (i) The copying is at the instance and inspiration of the individual teacher, and
  • (ii) The inspiration and decision to use the work and the moment of its use for maximum teaching effectiveness are so close in time that it would be unreasonable to expect a timely reply to a request for permission.

Cumulative Effect

  • (i) The copying of the material is for only one course in the school in which the copies are made.
  • (ii) Not more than one short poem, article, story, essay or two excerpts may be copied from the same author, nor more than three from the same collective work or periodical volume during one class term.
  • (iii) There shall not be more than nine instances of such multiple copying for one course during one class term.

[The limitations stated in "ii" and "iii" above shall not apply to current news periodicals and newspapers and current news sections of other periodicals.]

III. Prohibitions as to I and II

Notwithstanding any of the above, the following shall be prohibited:

  • (A) Copying shall not be used to create or to replace or substitute for anthologies, compilations or collective works. Such replacement or substitution may occur whether copies of various works or excerpts there from are accumulated or reproduced and used separately.
  • (B) There shall be no copying of or from works intended to be "consumable" in the course of study or of teaching. These include workbooks, exercises, standardized tests and test booklets and answer sheets and like consumable material.
  • (C) Copying shall not:
  • (a) substitute for the purchase of books, publishers" reprints or periodicals;
  • (b) be directed by higher authority;
  • (c) be repeated with respect to the same item by the same teacher from term to term.
  • (D) No charge shall be made to the student beyond the actual cost of the photocopying.

Agreed March 19, 1976.
Ad Hoc Committee on Copyright Law Revision:
By Sheldon Elliott Steinbach.
Author-Publisher Group:
Authors League of America:
By Irwin Karp, Counsel.
Association of American Publishers, Inc.:
By Alexander C. Hoffman,
Chairman, Copyright Committee.